10 Ways to Bubblize Your Enemies in Rayman Origins

Ubisoft counts down the top 10 ways to ‘bubblize’ enemies in Rayman Origins. Punch ’em. Slap ’em. Crush ’em. Magic ’em up. The choice is yours — the result is always slapstick cartoon comedy!

Rayman Origins ships for PS3, Wii and Xbox 360 on November 15th. When you’re done watching the trailer, scroll on down for a Q&A with Game Director Sebastien Morin about the game’s combat system and “bubblizing.”

The fight system is very different from the first Rayman game, where possibilities of eliminating an enemy were much more limited. Can you talk about that?

In the first Rayman, the fight system was revolving around a simple attack: the charge attack. It created a simple and interesting tradeoff for the player: The more you waited, the farther you would attack. It worked great, but it was static.

In this game, we’ve decided to make it more fast-paced. We naturally sought out attacks that kept your momentum, so that you could keep chaining acrobatic moves, never stopping. Jump, slap, land, spin, run on the wall and kick some ass! It’s exhilarating.

So for every platforming move we had to invent way to defeat enemies without stopping the flow of the game. That’s where all the richness comes from.

How did you come up with so many moves and combos?

Our goal was to have players with very different skill sets be able to enjoy the flow of a platformer. So we came up with different moves for different skills. Begin with little punch, learn to kick in the air, and when you’re good enough just sprint your way spinning and taking out the bad guys. Additionally, we accidentally (not really) discovered that slapping your friends was even more fun. So the set of attack moves just grew dramatically with all those new and creative ways to annoy your friends.

Can you tell us what is your favorite move and why?

The kick in the air is my favorite, it never feels old. This move is central to the design of the game. It’s the key move in the learning process, one that transforms a regular platform player into an actual ninja.

Do the different playable characters have different attacks?

Yes there are subtle differences between each playable character, because we wanted each to feel unique. Since they have the same set of moves, it’s easy to switch from one to another when you feel like it.

Do the different enemies have particularities in the way they attack and in the way to eliminate them, as in the first Rayman game?

With this vast attack set, we allow the player to be quite creative. As the game progresses, enemies become more and more challenging against specific attacks. Everything is still possible, but at your own risk. Also, keep an eye out for some of the domino-like situations we have set up throughout the game. Players can really maximize the result of their attacks, strategically taking out several enemies in one shot!

There is no health bar in the GUI, how does the health system work in the game?

A health bar didn’t feel right in a game where you might lose all those hard earned “health points” by falling into a pit. So it was natural to limit those, and a great opportunity to get rid of the GUI. Instead we took the bubblizing approach. If you take a hit or fall into a pit you turn into a bubble. You can be revived by one of your co-op partners with a simple punch or jump. We also have placed hearts throughout the game which allow you to take a hit without turning into a bubble. Those will come in handy during some of the really challenging maps.

Sometimes, we can see lums coming out of enemies, either when we hit them or when we jump on their bubble. How does that work exactly?

In a nutshell, Lums are your score. We thought it made sense to reward the player with a lum for a well-executed slap in the face. However, that was not enough, especially in co-op mode. If your friend is running ahead, you are left with fewer opportunities to kick ass. So Michel came up with the idea to bubblize enemies. It was great, because all of a sudden lagging players could finish those bad guys, and earn one of those happy lums too.

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