Assassin’s Creed: Unity Delayed Two Weeks, Now Launching Day-and-Date With Assassin’s Creed: Rogue

AssassinsCreedUnity

I guess we can officially dub November 11th “Assassin’s Creed Day” for 2014, as that is now the day when both Assassin’s Creed: Unity and Assassin’s Creed: Rogue will launch. (Just to recap, Rogue will be on PS3 and Xbox 360, and Unity will be on PC, PS4 and Xbox One.)

November 11th has been the launch date for Rogue since it was announced, but it is a new, slightly-later-than-expected launch date for Unity, which had previously been slated to ship on October 28th. But that’s only a couple weeks off the original schedule, so there’s nothing to be alarmed by.

Those two extra weeks will give Ubisoft additional time to put on a final layer of polish and work right up to launch to prepare a Day 1 patch with even more improvements.

Via the UbiBlog, Ubisoft Sr. Communications Manager, Gary Steinman, stated:

“It’s the little things. A tiny gesture that Arno makes as he’s racing across the Parisian rooftops. A barely noticeable reaction from a solitary NPC in a crowd 3,000 deep. The subtle swaying motion of an opulent chandelier in a lavish ballroom. It’s these little things, multiplied by the thousands, that a development team focuses on during the final push to ship a game. And with a massive open-world title like Assassin’s Creed Unity, all those little things add up fast. Toss in the fact that Unity has been built from the ground up as a new-gen Assassin’s Creed – and that final straight-line sprint to the finish suddenly feels like an obstacle course laden with curves, hurdles and pitfalls.”

Commenting about the delay and ongoing development, Senior Producer Vincent Pontbriand elaborated further:

“This being a fully next-gen game, it requires a lot of work, a lot of production, and a lot of learning. It’s always hard to be precise and to quantify exactly how much work is involved. So as we get close to the finish we often realize we’re near the target but we’re not quite there yet.

We rebuilt most of the systems. Sometimes to improve the experience. Sometimes to improve the gameplay itself. Sometimes to reskin it, to make it look fresh all over again. Or sometimes because we had to make everything online-compatible.

And AC is a huge open-world game. We have thousands of NPCs on screen. We have more depth in the types of AI we’ve built. The graphics are spectacular. The processes are way more complex. Which makes it exponentially harder to grasp everything than it was in the previous generation.

We’re very confident in the game we’re making.

Making games is not a precise science. It’s a leap of faith. There’s a good level of subjectivity and creativity. We have a bunch of us who have spent two, three years or more on this project. It’s a huge personal investment. People have been truly dedicated to this game. For them it’s also important to make a game that they can be proud of.

We honestly appreciate their commitment to the game and their patience. It’s just a couple more weeks. And it’s going to be worth it.”

While we’re on the subject of Rogue and Unity, be sure to check out the recent videos showcasing half an hour of gameplay footage from the Assassin’s Creed duo.

Source: Assassin’s Creed Unity Available on Nov 11 (US), Nov 13 (EMEA) [UbiBlog]

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