Mario Party, Dragon Quest and Monopoly Make a Wii Baby

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There’s a ninth Mario Party on the way, but that’s not the Wii board game you should be looking forward to this year. Fortune Street is. I’ve never heard of it before, but supposedly it’s been a huge hit in Japan.

Developed by Square Enix, Fortune Street pairs characters from Dragon Quest with the Mushroom Kingdom’s finest and Mii avatars for a friendly round of stock market investment strategy and real estate management, all within a Mario Party-style board game setting.

In the game, savvy Wii investors compete against each other to accumulate the most wealth by buying, selling and trading property, playing the stock market, setting up adjacent shops to earn high shopping fees from players who land on them, and collecting special symbols to cash in at the bank for extra gold.

Fortune Street, available in North America this holiday season for Wii, features 15 different game boards, multiple difficulty settings for newcomers and experienced investors, and support for four players. The only problem is the generic title. For a game with Mario and Dragon Quest characters, it seems like Nintendo could have come up with a title a whole lot more identifiable and exciting than Fortune Street.

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About the Author

Matt Litten is the full-time editor and owner of VGBlogger.com. He is responsible for maintaining the day to day operation of the site, editing all staff content before it is published, and contributing regular news, reviews, previews and other articles. Matt landed his first gig in the video game review business writing for the now-defunct website BonusStage.com. After the sad and untimely close of BonusStage, the former staff went on to found VGBlogger.com. After a short stint as US Site Manager for AceGamez, Matt assumed full ownership over VGBlogger, and to this day he is dedicated to making it one of the top video game blogs in all the blogosphere. Matt is a fair-minded reviewer and lover of games of all platforms and types, big or small, hyped or niche, big-budget or indie. But that doesn't mean he will let poor games slide without a good thrashing when necessary!